True Light of Christmas

Christmas for quotography n TT

Sharing with Quotography and Texture Tuesday.

As foretold by the angel Gabriel, she brought forth her firstborn son and wrapped him in swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger because there was no room for them at the inn. And there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night. And, lo, the angel of the Lord came upon them: and they were sore afraid. The angel brought great tidings of great joy to the shepherds that a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord has been born.

The birth that night brought light into our lives of Hope for our salvation. Through him all things are possible because in him was life; and the life was the light of men.

I love Christmas and Santa Claus. To me, they are definitely two separate events. There are many stories about St. Nick who gave Christmas to children. There is also a baby born that gave Christmas to all mankind. I remember and celebrate both, Happy Birthday Jesus AND Merry Christmas. (I never X the Christ out of Christmas).

As we head into this holiday season, I pray all families everywhere are blessed with the Christmas spirit and loving hearts abound.

Peabea

 

 

 

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12 Comments

    1. Thank you Nonnie. Always can learn something new. I find I was among the ones with the misconception. Should have taken the time over the years to explore its meaning. Lisa headed me toward a post she’d done on the usage of xmas. I’m always glad when visitors leave comments and always glad to learn something I didn’t understand. After seeing your explanation as well as hers, I looked it up for myself and found:

      Xmas is a common abbreviation of the word Christmas . It is sometimes pronounced /ˈɛksməs/, but it, and variants such as Xtemass, originated as handwriting abbreviations for the typical pronunciation /ˈkrɪsməs/. The “-mas” part is from the Latin-derived Old English word for Mass,[1] while the “X” comes from the Greek letter Chi, which is the first letter of the Greek word Χριστός which comes into English as “Christ”.[2]
      There is a common misconception that the word Xmas stems from a secular attempt to remove the religious tradition from Christmas[3] by taking the “Christ” out of “Christmas”, but its use dates back to the 16th century.

      Have a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. 🙂

    1. Thanks Kelley…I am trying to get back to that is the reason for the season as it did almost get lost with me over the years. Thanks for visiting and commenting. 🙂

Love seeing your comments. I read each one. Thank you.

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